Friday Clicks [Volume 25] | The Best of the Social Web

It’s nearly Mother’s Day. Have you bought a card? A nice present? Maybe a box of chocolates? Either way, you gotta remember to call not only Mom, but also Grandma, Great-Grandma and any other women in your life who has had an impact on you. Fo real. Do it. Mothers (and women in general) do not get enough credit in our world. Take some time to thank them this weekend and do something nice for them.

The Links:

  • Mobile websites are going to continue to become more and more important for marketers. It’s like a breath of fresh air when I come across a great mobile site (take a look at www.americanadsm.com, for instance, on your mobile). Here are 8 tips to make yours more user-friendly. Hint: Simplicity is key. (click here)
  • Apparently Bing (that other search engine…) is going to be unveiling a major redesign that is more heavily focused on social. Will they make a dent? Probably not. But ya never know. If nothing else, keep Bing and Yahoo in mind for SEO purposes. (click here)
  • Facebook made big news last fall when it rolled out it’s iPad app. The problem is that they haven’t really updated it – and in fact it doesn’t even sport Timeline yet. Fail. Some reports say Facebook (and Zuck) don’t really care, though, about mobile. Big mistake if it’s true. (click here)
  • There is a new round of video sharing sites vying to become the next Instagram (but for video, of course). Will you be creating an account anytime soon? (click here)
  • Speaking of Instagram – here are some etiquette rules for you to consider. (click here)
  • Finally, if you need something fun to post on your mom’s Facebook wall, consider this. I did.

Have a great weekend and let us know on Facebook or Twitter if we missed anything!

 

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy is a blog-reading, report-writing project manager. In his spare time he enjoys reading a good thriller, drinking a freshly brewed cup of coffee, and spending time with his wife.

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5 Apps in 30 Seconds: Volume I

If you haven’t realized it yet, 2012 is all about two things: visuals and mobile. In an earlier blog post, I wrote the following: “That’s why 2012 is also the year of the photo-editing/sharing mobile apps. There are so many apps that exist within the iPhone/iPad App Store and Android Market that you can be using to share unique photos for your business or brand. So why aren’t you?” (Read the full post here).

When I published that post, it was my hope that readers recognized how important having a smart phone is when it comes to creating and sharing valuable content on social media sites.

I’ve had my iPhone for about four months since dumping my Android device. In that short span of time, I’ve gone app-crazy. I spend a lot of time reading about new apps. I download them, I teach myself how to use them, and then I recommend the ones I like to friends and coworkers.

Since I’ve received a lot of positive feedback from others about the apps I recommend, I decided to launch a new series on this blog that I’m calling 5 Apps in 30 Seconds. In each installment, I’ll decide on a theme to focus on, choose 5 apps based on the theme, and share them with you in a quick video.

In this first installment, I’m focusing on content creation apps as my main theme. The apps mentioned in the video below are apps that I believe businesses and brands could and should be using to develop interesting, entertaining, educational, and original content for their social media sites and overall online presence. Watch the video below now to hear my recommendations.

To download or learn more about the apps mentioned in the video, look for the links in the description section of the YouTube video. 

If you do end up downloading and liking any of the apps I recommended, please let me know! Come back and leave a comment on this blog post, or let me know on Twitter. I’m @RobWormley.

By the way, you might notice that I focus mostly on iPhone apps in this series. That should be a hint. Dump your droid and get an iPhone. It’s worth it. If you are too stubborn, however, click here for a list of the top 100 apps for Android.

Want to suggest an app for me to test out? Let me know! Send me a tweet or email me directly.

Rob Wormley

Rob Wormley

As a social media specialist, Rob thrives in situations that require constant creativity. On days when Rob isn’t working hard to create, maintain, and strengthen relationships online, you might find him spending time with family, browsing through his nearest bookstore, or sipping on a cup of coffee at his local Starbucks.

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How Bold Can You Be On Social Media?

Everyone and their mother is jumping on the social media bandwagon. Companies know they need to have a social media presence but aren’t sure where to go with it. What seems to be the biggest question they ask themselves?

How do we stick out as a company that “gets it” on social media and grow our audience base?

You don’t want to get lost in the inter-webs as just another tweet, Facebook post or boring blog, and you don’t want to be labeled as the dinosaur company who isn’t on social media. We’ve talked a lot about how your business needs to be providing value in social media, but how else can you stand out from your competition?

Be Bold.

How Bold? Well, let’s take a look at the examples of three companies mentioned by Mashable in their article about the “10 Sassy Brands on Social Media.”

Wonderful Pistachios

This brand could just sit on social media and talk about the health benefits of pistachios, share recipes or other boring value pieces, but instead, they chose to be BOLD. Their “Get Crackin’” campaign has featured popular entertainment figures and Internet memes (think Honey Badger, the Winklevoss twins and Snooki.) Their TV commercials have really made a splash on the airwaves. How else are they bold? Check out how they respond to followers on Twitter. Not only do they choose to respond to people directly, but they’ve established a voice of quirkiness as well – a tone you wouldn’t necessarily expect from a nut company.

One of the best (and most creative) parts? Employees dressing up in giant pistachio suits to accompany their snarky, creative Facebook posts. Check it out!

wonderful pistachio social media

 

Pepsi Next

This faction of Pepsi decided to bring in partners for their social media boldness. The main weapon? Video. Teaming up with Funny Or Die, Pepsi Next created a marketing stunt where improv comedians impersonated the Facebook personas of their followers.

The campaign, called “Internet Taste Test,” required fans to opt in, then based on their profiles, the improv comedians created a 30-second clip of what the follower would act like trying their product. Here’s an example:

Kraft Macaroni and Cheese

This beloved product (to people of all ages) decided to mix the old with the new to create the bold. In celebration of their 75th anniversary, Kraft decided to temporarily pass the social media torch over to a couple of lovely women in their 80s. Using the hashtag #OldBirdsNewTweets, followers joined the conversation as the two ladies learned about memes, Internet slang and technology. An entertaining experience for all!

The best part? These lovely “old birds” learning the concept of planking. Talk about bringing together older and younger generations. Kraft got this one right!

 

What does your company do to stand out and be bold? Let us know in the comments below or on our Facebook page!

Kelsey Jones

Kelsey Jones

Social Media enthusiast who loves reading about and experimenting with the newest forms of communication. I'm a news and political junkie who loves advocacy work, the Green Bay Packers and working in this fast-paced environment.

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Friday Clicks [Volume 23] | The Best of the Social Web

As far as hard social media news goes, there’s not much to tell ya this week. Sorry folks. We do have plenty of other great stuff to share though, so let’s jump right in.

The Links:

  • Klout is supposedly launching branded pages soon.. er, “squads”.. so you can see the exact people who are the biggest influencers of your brand. The real question, though, is does it all matter? (click here)
  • Speaking of Klout, what does your score really mean? This interesting piece talks about how a score on a website may not in fact be the best indicator of one’s influence or expertise. (click here)
  • Putting social media into your traditional advertisements is effective after all. Not to pat our own backs, but here at One Social Media we’ve been telling clients this from the very beginning. The most effective campaigns include both new and traditional media. (click here)
  • A new dashboard for Pinterest has launched that is supposed to act like a Tweetdeck or Hootsuite for the popular pinning service. Schedule pins, see all your re-pins and likes, etc. Quite interesting. (click here)
  • LinkedIn launched an iPad app this week – and a very nice looking one at that. It reads much like a newspaper, with people’s updates, stories shared and folks changing positions. Have you downloaded it yet? (click here)
  • Last, but certainly not least, we bring you “Guy On A Buffalo”. The video is taken from a 70s film called “Buffalo Rider”. With it now being public domain, a folk band made up a song and satirical lyrics to go with it. If you have 9 minutes, please watch all four episodes.


Having trouble viewing? Click here.
Did we miss anything? Let us know on Facebook and Twitter!

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy is a blog-reading, report-writing project manager. In his spare time he enjoys reading a good thriller, drinking a freshly brewed cup of coffee, and spending time with his wife.

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Friday Clicks [Volume 22] | The Best of the Social Web

Well, all in all, it was a pretty normal week. If anything, I’m seeing a trend in social media being downsized (as is evidenced by one of our clicks), or being ridiculed in some way or another. It’s quite interesting to be observing. Are we reaching a tipping point where people start to get sick of it? In all honesty, it happens to me sometimes, and I’ve intentionally scaled back a little bit in terms of friends, followers and overall time spent on social media. How about you?

The Links:

  • A new “social network” application launched in the last couple weeks called Pair. The purpose of the app is for couples (or besties?) to have a little stream of pictures, drawings and messages. Oh, and don’t forget the “thumbkiss”. How this is different than just texting, I don’t really know. Maybe you’ll have to find out for yourself. (click here)
  • If you aren’t familiar with The Oatmeal, you should be. It’s a site just for silly comics about random life situations. They recently did one about “How to get more Likes on Facebook”. It’s quite hilarious, and also a little vulgar. You’re guaranteed to LOL though. (click here)
  • CNN did a feature on how and when Facebook became the uncool kid on the block. It’s pretty interesting reading. Did Instagram join that uncool club? (click here)
  • A slightly humorous but also sad look at how dumb some athletes are on Twitter. They learn the tough lesson that while America has free speech, if you have an employer, there very well may be consequences for the words that come out of your mouth. (click here)
  • A new report shows that over one-quarter of ALL emails are opened on mobile devices, whether smartphones or tablets. Email marketing is NOT dead, believe it or not, so make sure the emails you are sending are optimized for reading on mobile devices. It’s more important than ever. (click here)
  • For your fun video of the week we present “Burger Rock” by Jumoke Hill.

Having trouble viewing the video? Click here to watch on YouTube.

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy is a blog-reading, report-writing project manager. In his spare time he enjoys reading a good thriller, drinking a freshly brewed cup of coffee, and spending time with his wife.

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Can Social Media Be an Artistic Outlet?

In my last blog post, The Language of Social Media, I wrote about how social media is changing the way we write. Our vocabulary, grammar, and punctuation all take a back seat to being casual and brief.

Whether this movement is good or bad is entirely debatable: there’s no objective answer. But regardless of your view on the matter, some people are embracing this change and seeing it as an opportunity instead of an obstacle. Here’s one of them.

Teju Cole is a Nigerian-American writer, who has spent time living in both countries. Cole’s experiences give him a unique perspective on life, death, and the different social issues that America and Nigeria face. Along with being an accomplished author and photographer, Cole uses his Twitter account as an artistic outlet of a different kind.

Cole’s tweets mix social commentary, American history, and Nigerian culture– only he writes them as poetry. This unique blend of content and delivery often come off as morose obituaries or headlines, and they certainly aren’t for the weak-hearted. Still, Cole achieves a goal that most of the Twitterverse has yet to reach: he makes you think. Here are some recent examples of his tweets:

What Cole proves without a doubt is that social media can be used as an artistic outlet. And I don’t mean in the way that bands, artists, and authors use it to promote their newest product– I mean it in the sense that social media is providing the actual basis for creation. Twitter is Cole’s canvas, not just a place where he can post a link for people to view or buy his canvas.

On top of that, Cole hardly ever self-promotes on his Twitter. After going back through a week’s worth of tweets (probably about 100), the only kind of posts I could find besides the ones shown above, are the occasional wordy (albeit macabre) joke, and a lot of interaction with his followers.

Cole is showing how to make a personal brand through social media while keeping his integrity as an artist. So what can we take from his example? A lot of things:

  • Be unique.
  • Provide value in a way that nobody else is.
  • Don’t be overly-promotional.
  • Write about what you know and care about.
  • Don’t be afraid to be provocative.
  • Be persistent.
  • Don’t complain about or shun change: use it to your advantage
  • Be consistent.
  • Turn obstacles and restrictions into opportunities.
Tom Hummer

Tom Hummer

Tom’s two biggest passions in life are writing and music. In his free time, Tom reads, writes, and works on musical projects.

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Friday Clicks [Volume 21] | The Best of the Social Web

Well, the Internet nearly broke this week when Facebook bought Instagram. That’s been covered endlessly by many other outlets, so I won’t worry about it here. <soapbox> A note to those who were vehemently angry about it, however: if you’re so upset, stop using Facebook. That’s the only way the domination of Google and Facebook in the social/digital sphere will stop. If we keep using them all the same, nothing will change. </end soapbox>

The Links:

  • Credit cards are hopping onto the social train is some quite innovative ways. Financial institutions have traditionally been terrified of jumping into it because of tight industry regulations. American Express, though, is finding ways to give Twitter users special savings using hashtags. Pretty cool. (Click here)
  • Spotify released an embeddable “Play” button – so you can add music to blogs, websites, etc. This doesn’t seem inherently social, but the implications are huge. Stream music to your blog and perhaps in the future to Facebook, and you can trigger people’s memories and emotions in unique ways. (Click here)
  • Out of nowhere Google did a total redesign of Google+. It doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to me, but it seems to look nice. Worth noting is a new “Cover Photo” option. Wonder where that idea came from… (Click here)
  • Grantland.com, a well known sports blog believe it or not, talks about the issue of digital elitism. It notes how belonging in a “secret” club (like Instragram was) gave us a nice big digital ego. Fascinating read, and my favorite article of the week. (Click here)
  • Another more philosophical piece here, but Slate discusses how the Internet, despite being an unending well of knowledge, can actually polarize us even more, especially in terms of politics. (Click here)
  • And now to make you giggle. The video below gets better every single time you watch it, and EVERY LINE is a golden nugget. Every. Single. Line.

Did we miss anything? Let us know on Facebook and Twitter!

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy is a blog-reading, report-writing project manager. In his spare time he enjoys reading a good thriller, drinking a freshly brewed cup of coffee, and spending time with his wife.

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40 Days in the Desert (without Twitter…) | Lenten Reflections

I am a social media professional. I am also a Christian. Every year I try to do something meaningful for Lent. Maybe it’s some intentional reflection, or giving up something that plays a big role in my life. The hope and intent is that giving something up brings you closer to God. This year, as both social media experiment and spiritual endeavor, I thought it would be interesting to give up Twitter for 40 long days (closer to 46 or so when you include Sundays).

Now, a lot of people give up some form of social media for Lent. It’s also not an integral part of their career, however. I obviously had to establish that I would in fact continue tweeting for clients, just not myself. I realized a few things during my time without Twitter that I’d like to share. Some might be deep, most probably aren’t, but they are reflections nonetheless.

  • Most people didn’t even notice. I got a couple people saying they missed my tweets, but the majority of people I spoke with were surprised to hear that I took Twitter off – even when I told them a month into my experiment. They obviously weren’t missing much in their world without my tweets.
  • I did feel less informed. I had to intentionally seek out news versus just let it come to me in a 140-character stream. People would ask “Did you see ____”, and whereas before I could usually answer “Yes” – I had to say “No” quite a few times and feel a little left out.
  • The above didn’t actually impact what I knew. What I mean by that, is that ultimately I was informed. It just happened to be through other outlets (Facebook, “real” conversations, etc), and it just happened to be approximately 10-30 minutes later than I normally would have been informed.
  • The things I missed out on were mostly superfluous. Yes, I’m probably a little more knowledgeable of things when I’m on Twitter. I read more random links. But these aren’t things that necessarily make me a better human. Most the time, actually, I’m being distracted from my job and getting something done.
  • Social networks themselves are neutral mediums. Especially in 2012, we’re seeing people start to discuss the perils of social networking and digital communities. We also see folks ringing their praises as the greatest thing since sliced bread. The platforms themselves, however, are neither. It what’s we do with them that makes them good/bad. Are you seeing your relationships go bad because of social networks? Take some time off. Are you seeing your relationships enhanced because of social networks? Keep doing what you’re doing. To make blanket statements about social media, however, is as foolish as making blanket statements about things like cars or microwaves. You can do good and bad things with both of them, the choice is yours.
  • Having said that, my relationships were in fact enhanced by taking some time off. I realized that I could communicate with people through personal and more intimate emails (intimate as in revealing more details about life, not the other kind of intimate) or phone calls. My relationships weren’t so much surface level. I spent more time talking with my wife in our back yard than sitting on our couch with iPads. It was refreshing, to say the least.
  • I’m excited to be back. Because of the fact that I took some time off to reflect on how social media impacts my life, I feel more confident that I can use it smartly versus just doing it because it’s my job and it’s in front of me. I really have cultivated a small community on Twitter and I enjoy the conversation that happens.

All I ask is that you reflect a little and think intentionally about how you use social media in your own life, and the kind of impact (whether subtle or not) it has on your daily interactions with people.

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy is a blog-reading, report-writing project manager. In his spare time he enjoys reading a good thriller, drinking a freshly brewed cup of coffee, and spending time with his wife.

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Friday Clicks [Volume 20] | The Best of the Social Web

This was a full week with a bevy of digital April Fool’s jokes and the mega-popular app Instragram finally coming to Android phones everywhere. It’s also a good week to think about what kind of message your company sends out over a holiday weekend. Do you feel comfortable posting about Easter? If not, that’s okay, it’s just wise to have that discussion before the time actually comes.

The Links:

  • Photo-sharing is becoming more and more popular as people’s attention spans for reading go down. So which sharing site is right for you? Our opinion is probably some combo of Tumblr and Instagram. (Click here)
  • I’ll again highlight my love of craft beer with a blog post from New Belgium Brewing Company. They launched a new beer, and with it one of the more creative marketing campaigns I’ve seen this year. It includes: an infographic, a mobile app and even a Pandora radio station. (Click here – you’ll have to go through an age-gate)
  • There have been a number of companies jumping on Pinterest lately, but Kotex seems to have embarked on the first true marketing campaign using the new-ish site. Pretty interesting! (Click here)
  • This is one of the more incredible infographics I’ve seen detailing the rise of Draw Something. It’s the fastest app to ever reach 50 million downloads. (Click here)
  • Yes, Google+ IS still around, and folks ARE still using it. All kidding aside, Chris Brogan featured an infographic on his blog detailing how people can use it for 10ish minutes a day and find success. (Click here)
  • Singer Kimberly Cole held a dance audition for a music video, and a nerdy guy showed up with incredible dance moves. It’s clearly a joke, but the dude is a totally legit dancer. It’s quite awesome.

Did we miss anything? Let us know on Facebook or Twitter!

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy Anderberg

Jeremy is a blog-reading, report-writing project manager. In his spare time he enjoys reading a good thriller, drinking a freshly brewed cup of coffee, and spending time with his wife.

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When To Put Your Mobile Device Away – Digital Respect

In a world consumed by online interactions, niche (sometimes referred to as “weird”) communities, personal/business profiles or the latest apps (video, music, photography, or daily deals); it’s no wonder people are increasingly irritated by what the digital device is doing to ACTUAL social interaction and relationships.

Have you ever gone to a restaurant and observed people texting under the table? Checking Twitter or Facebook on their phones or iPads? Have YOU ever been that person?

This even happens in an office setting. Have you ever been in a meeting where you or someone else is speaking and you realize most heads are looking down at their phones or iPads and most likely not paying attention? (Although, it’s fair to say that sometimes people do take notes or are commenting about certain speakers/news …but I’m going to go out on a not-so-far limb and say this isn’t the norm).

Texting in Meeting Social Media

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when we see these situations going on: That’s just rude.

It’s time (long past time, actually) that we all take a step back, set down our digital devices, and remember that along with the digital freedom comes human respect. Whether you’re spending time with family and friends or in the office (even if it’s a boring meeting), we all need to keep in mind that consistently losing eye contact with someone because you are addicted to your mobile device is rude. End of story.

There’s a time and a place for the digital world – heck, it’s my profession! But we also need to remember that there’s a time and place to turn those devices off and give other human beings our undivided attention. I’m just as guilty as anyone else reading this blog.

So, what can we do?

  • Unplug when it’s necessary.
  • Focus on eye contact.
  • Hold conversations longer than five minutes that don’t involve a computer/phone/iPad etc.

Remember, your behaviors have an impact on your kids, spouse, co-workers and your IN PERSON reputation.

Find the balance. Enjoy and embrace the benefits of the digital world, but learn to cherish and thrive in (real) uninterrupted human interaction as well.

It’s important. 

when to put your phone away

 

Kelsey Jones

Kelsey Jones

Social Media enthusiast who loves reading about and experimenting with the newest forms of communication. I'm a news and political junkie who loves advocacy work, the Green Bay Packers and working in this fast-paced environment.

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